Hahnemann’s concept of Illness. (Background thinking for the Mallorca Seminar)

palma roomHahnemann’s concept of Illness

(Click here for details of the Mallorca Seminar)

Hahnemann believed that the signs and symptoms of a case of illness represented an attempt by the body to heal itself. According to this view, the signs and symptoms do not represent the illness, but rather the reaction of the person to his illness. The illness and the reaction to illness are separate. Therefore Hahnemann reasoned that physician should administer that medicine to the patient which produced in the healthy signs and symptoms similar to those of the patient. In this manner the natural attempt of the body to heal itself would be re­inforced, rather than neutralised or interfered with. Hahne­mann called this treatment of illness with medicines which produced in the healthy symptoms similar to those of the ill>Homoeopathy (Homois: Similar; Pathos: suffering).

Nature of Cure in illness

If an ill person receives no treatment, he either dies, remains chronically ill or recovers. If he recovers, his pattern of re­covery is like that of all sick persons and separate from his particular disease. As people become ill, old symptoms of previous illness often reappear. The symptoms move from non-vital organs, like the nose and throat, to more vital organs, like the kidneys and lungs. Then there is a period of crisis. Following this crisis, one by one and in reverse order of their appearance, the symptoms move from vital to less vital organs until the patient is well again. This natural response is called auto therapy.

Under homoeopathic treatment an identical response usually follows, rather than the abrupt disappearance of symptoms or the introduction of new symptoms which often follows other types of treatment.

Homoeopathy, from its inception has been based on an inclusive, descriptive attitude towards the patient and the medicine and the response of the patient is equally inclusive in relation to the natural course his illness would have taken without treatment. After he has made his initial, descriptive inclusive analysis of the patient and the medicine, the homoeopathic physician may then indulge in analytic specula­tion. Throughout the 19th century until the present time the majority of scientists have been analytically oriented after accepting as relevant only the information which fits within their particular scheme. In contrast to this Hahnemannian approach to science was pre-Newtonian. It was the same, non-mechanical, descriptive manner in which Cuvier described the botanical kingdom or Dana, the mineralogical world. Or at the other end of the time-scale the same manner in which the present-day physicists are following up Anderson’s discovery in 1938 of sub-nuclear particles and of the fourth great revolution in physics of the world of sub-nuclear energies.

An ultra-mechanistic view-point is characterised by the usual mechanistic concepts, and in addition, it also includes at least the acceptance of a causal, unpredictable, unstable phenomena whose wholes are greater than the sum of their parts. The observer must attempt to be completely inclusive and unbiased in his approach to a field of interest. He must accept the totality of the relationships that make it up. This total approach is called “Holism”. As a result of a total or holistic view of all the phenomena in a field, certain data may be found to co-exist with each other. Jung calls the temporal co-existence “synchronicity”.

Let us now consider the application of this ultra-mechanistic view point in the field of modern physics:

The skeleton of the physical universe in the 19th century was considered to consist of six unrelated functions, viz., 1. Space; 2. Time; 3. Matter; 4. Energy; 5. Gravity; 6. Inertia.

Over a period of 50 years Einstein gradually related each of these functions with each other by means of ingeniously derived formula e.g.,

 (a)      Integration of space and time in his conception of fourth dimension.

 (b)      Matter and Energy are interchangeable as evident by the equation: Energy =mass x velocity of light squared (by application of Planck’s Quantum Theory to the transmission of light).

(c)   In Einstein’s special Theory of Relativity he showed that space-time-energy and Matter are interchangeable, e.g., Mass of a body is a function of its motion. At the speed of light a body would have no weight at all. .

[d] In his gravitational field physics theory Einstein showed that all matter is surrounded by a gravitational field and that inertia is a function of this field. From this it follows that the space is curved, since matter travels in response to this curved field pattern.

(e) Shortly before his death Einstein announced his unified field theory in which he attempted to unite all six com­ponents of our universe in one continuum.

The new physics is concerned with specific, discontinuous energies which are basically uncertain and within certain relative areas are woven together in an acausal, unpredictable manner throughout a space-time-matter-energy-gravity-intertia continuum. It views the universe in an ultra-mechanistic, holistic, descriptive manner.

Homoeopathy is also concerned with the specific, discon­tinuous action of dynamized sub-atomic energies whose action is uncertain and statistical rather than analytic.

The homoeopathic approach to the patient and medicine is descriptively inclusive and holistic.

In future, homoeopathy may take its place as a pioneer approach in medicine toward a therapeutic psycho-somatic synthesis.

 

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