Case review of potatoes

Okay:

Case dissection.

The previous evening had partaken of a bowl of new potatoes. Within an hour had begun to feel nauseous. A sense of pressure developed in the upper stomach area. The nausea was accompanied by a desire to burp to relieve the pressure but felt the burp itself would only come halfway up the throat leaving a burning sensation and no relief. Patient had much increased saliva and felt “deathly” and was really uncomfortable.  Said colic pains had started and desired to stool as well as burp but unable to.

  • Causation: Potatoes. 5 medicines.
  • Alum. Sepia. Verat. Coloc. Am-m.

From the immediate reaction, we can be fairly confident that the cause is Potatoes. We do not have to even do any more than read the 5 medicines. However, for the sake of the practitioners who do not know the medicines, we can go further.

  • Result: Saliva increased. This drops medicine choice to 3. Alum. Sepia and Veratrum.
  • Cannot burp: rises in throat, burns. This is an innefectual reflux.
  • This brings it to 2 medicines. Veratrum and Alum.

A this point,  it is easiest to read the medicines. However, from experience, a comment made about feeling “deathly” made me look at the feeling for future use.

When a patient feels deathly, its a mixture of being so ill that they want to be alone, are nauseated by everything, food drink, being disturbed etc. I have experienced this sensation as I am sure some of you have. So I took the rubric Nausea: disgust, loathing and added it to the repertorization.

Of course I had to justify through the Materia Medica. Chronic Diseases. S Hahnemann.

  • 442:Bitter eructations after eating potatoes, so that the shook for loathing, in the evening
  • 424:– After eating potatoes, stomach-ache, sick feeling, nausea, and then colicky pains.
  • 438:Frequent empty eructations
  • 443:– Rancid eructations, which leave behind a long continued burning in the throat
  • 469: Pressure in the stomach up to the throat, after eating potatoes, alleviated by eructations, in the morning

A read of all the nausea symptoms will confirm the ill feeling experienced. A medicine will produce a state, or symptoms, it will not always match precisely in every detail but it will show the experienced practitioner the key points to prescribe on.

I had to read VERY carefully to differentiate medicines. In the event, the patient was relieved in a couple of hours………

 

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2 responses to “Case review of potatoes

  1. I also read in alumina after doing a search for eructation:
    1163 Weary, dizzy in the head, the pulse often feverish, and in disposed to work, for several days ; also little appetite ; after dinner sleepy ; heaviness
    in the body, frequent inclination to eructation, which however does not take place at all or only imperfectly

    Is that usable even though its part of a syndrome that isn’t quite like what the patient in our case had?

    Also, I was taught not to trust small rubrics for elimination when using Kent or the Completer Repertory so its hard to learn to trust them when using the TPB!

    thanks,

    Ed

    • The reason you were taught not to use small rubrics in Kent is simply because experience taught that Kents rubrics to be not trustworthy.
      A remedy picture should be possible through the sum of its parts, no matter where located. However, the main combination of rubrics for the patient SHOULD represent the disease in its entirety, and as such you need to stick with what is perceived. In your example above you can see fragments of the patients disorder, but its not enough to base the prescription on, in my opinion, but is semi confirmatory IF the main symptoms lead to a remedy.
      It is called the law of SIMILARS and not the law of EXACTS for a reason.

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