Hahnemann the experimenter

This material is found in the case of Thomas Everest DF-14, (Hahnemanns case books) which spans the years 1842-1843. I have worked on this case for a number of years as it shows Hahnemann treating a tri-miasmatic complex disorder. The patient was an psoric patient who had many symptoms dating back to his earlier years when he was in India. Hahnemann was treating him quite successfully with Sulphur in the LM potency from 0/1, 0/2, 0/3, etc., and when he contracted gonorrhea while under treatment in Paris.
Hahnemann used Cannabis for the primary gonorrhea symptoms and Thuja for the underlying sycosis.This treatment worked very well. The patient also had some syphilitic symptoms in the background which Mercury acted upon. The seem to be a point in the case where there were still some lingering venereal symptoms when Hahnemann suddenly gave made a synthetic prescription by combining two symptoms from the repertory. One side of the rubric was itching in the anus – Sulphur AND the other side of the rubric was made from XXX. Samuel made a bracket embracing the remedies Mercury from one rubric and Sulphur from then rubric pointing to Cinnabaris (Red Sulphide of Mercury) in the 0/21.

The T. Everest casebook entry was an example of an experimental synthetic prescription using the two rubrics from Boenninghausen’s Alphabetical Repertory, Part One, Embracing the Remedies which are Antipsoric, Antisycotic and Antisyphilitic. This is also commonly called the Repertory of Antipsoric Remedies. Hahnemann clearly makes up a composite rubric from the symptoms of Sulphur + Mercury equaling = Cinnabaris, which is not in the repertory. This remedy aggravated the patient’s anger but then removed the remaining venereal tendencies. Secondly, he gave this experimental synthetic remedy in the 0/21 potency as an opening potency. This were the basic circumstances.

The Following quote is taken from the case of Thomas Everest, Hahnemannn’s Paris Casebooks, DF 14. The French text was produced by David Little and translated by J. C. Ravalard, MD and edited by Jill Gittins. The German rubrics were taken from the German edition of the A Systematic Alphabetic Repertory of Homoeopathic Remedies, Part 1, Embracing the Antipsoric, Antisycotic and Antisphylitic Remedies supplied by Chris Gillen and translated by Oda Schiller of Germany. This material is protected by copyright laws by David Little and HOE 2004 in agreement with the RBI in Germany.

March 25th, 1843

25 = night of 22/23 still eructation and cutting pain in epigastrium has been forced to get up at night – the appetite had gone away – today the appetite came back – anal itching better – almost completely stopped – still does not sleep well – abdomen and epigastrium better – since the 22nd itching and sensitiveness of ears increased – fears a new attack

[German rubric: Juecken in den Ohren] Itching in the ears; Sulph.
[German rubric: Juecken am After] Itching at the anus; Merc.

} Cinn. [These two rubrics are joined by a bracket after which is written Cinnabaris]

Prescription

Cinn 21/0 – 7 ½ – 1 tablespoon – glass – to take 1, 2 teaspoon [Cinnabaris 0/21 in a 7 ½ tablespoon solution, 1 tablespoon into a dilution glass, to take 1, then 2 teaspoons] (French: 1 c. a b. v. pr. 1, 2 p. c.)

Commentary

This is exactly what is written in the Paris Casebooks. Hahnemann made a bracket that embraces the Itching in the ears; Sulph. and the Itching at the anus; Merc. } and then wrote Cinnabaris. The Sulphur and Mercury can be found under these rubrics in A Systematic Alphabetic Repertory of Homoeopathic Remedies, Part 1, Embracing the Antipsoric, Antisycotic and Antisphylitic Remedies.

1. A Systematic Alphabetic Repertory of Homœopathic Remedies, First Part, Embracing the Antipsoric, Antisycotic and Antisyphilitic Remedies lists the following remedies under the rubric:

Ears and Hearing, In the ears, Itching (Gr. Oren und Gehoer, In den Ohren, Juecken): Agar. (3), Alum. (3), Amm. (4), Bar. (3), Bell. (2), Bov. (3), Calc. (2), Carb. veg. (2), Caust. (2), Coloc. (2), Con. (3), Daph. (2), Graph. (2), Hep. s. c. (2), Kali. (3), Lyc. (3), Mur. ac. (2), Natr. mur. (2), Nitr. (2), Nit. ac. (2), Petr. (2), Phosph. (3), Phosph. ac. (2), Plat. (2), Rhod. (2), Sassap. (3), Sep. (3), Sil. (3), Stann. (2), SULPH (4), Zinc. (2).

A Systematic Alphabetic Repertory of Homœopathic Remedies, First Part, Embracing the Antipsoric, Antisycotic and Antisyphilitic Remedies lists the following remedies under the rubric:

Anus: Itching (Gr. After: Juecken): Agar. (2), Alum. (3), Amm. (2), Bar. (4), Bell. (3), Calc. (3), Carb. veg. (2), Caust. (3), Con. (2), Euphorb. (3), Graph. (2), Kali. (4), Lyc. (2), Mur. ac. (2), Natr. (2), Nit. ac. (3), Petr. (2), Phosph. (3), Phosph. ac. (2), Plat. (3), Sassaap. (3), Seneg. (2), Sep. (4), Stann. (3), Zinc. (4). – MERC. (4).

The first component Hahnemann wrote down was Sulphur, which is found in the rubric ^itching in the ear.* The second component Hahnemann selected was Mercury, which is found in the rubric *itching at the anus*. Then Hahnemann connects them with a bracket } and writes down Cinn, Red Sulphide of Mercury, which is composed of Sulphur and Mercury. Hahnemann most likely studied Cinnabaris and other remedies in the Materia Medica Pura and Chronic Diseases. Nevertheless, the Paris casebooks show the above synthetic repertorization with Sulphur and Mecury } Cinn. are carefully marked in the prescription. These are the basic historical facts

David Little.

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One response to “Hahnemann the experimenter

  1. Its interesting that in Hering, Cinnabaris has itching of the ear, and itching pimples around the anus. Seems like Hahnemann could have known somehow that if his very limited proving of Cinnabaris had been continued it would have produced both the symptoms eventually. He wasn’t just putting together two remedies’ provings a la Kent. People could use this interpretation of this case as justification for combination remedies. Which is an unnecessary and unsupported procedure unless properly conducted provings are carried out on the combinations.

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